Is It A Carport Or A Bohio?

Again, we were at a decision point. Now that the carport concrete floor is poured, do I send Anibal and Francisco on their way, or do we get down to business with the tile?

I thought that the slab should cure for a while, at least a week. I went online and Googled DuckDuckGo‘d the question.

Knowledge and advice was all over the place. Two days. One week. One month. Many months. I chose to go with the person who said that by using modern mortar with polymer additives, the time shouldn’t matter much as long as the initial water was gone from the surface — the mortar will adhere well to the still-curing concrete and move with the drying floor slab and tiles won’t pop. Ask me in a year how it turned out.

So the next morning, we got to work tiling the new slab. Here are a couple photos of the completed floor:

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These are the same tile that we used in the living room and bedrooms.

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Note to self: I still need to paint the shop door!

Now the question is, is this area a carport or a bohio? A bohio (pronounced bo-E-o) (No Robin, it’s not B-OHIO) is an open-air structure, usually separate from the house, that is great for outdoor entertaining on a hot day in the tropics. Bohios often have facilities for barbecuing and/or cooking. Traditional bohio roofs are made of palm fronds and have a protected opening at the top to let hot air escape. You can see that my roof has this venting quality and it is actually very pleasant underneath on a hot day. The eastern exposure makes it even more pleasant on hot afternoons, not that it ever really gets that hot here in the mountains! So is it a carport or a bohio? I suppose that the answer could be, “Yes!”

We finished tiling the floor early on Thursday and I wanted the guys to finish the day or even one more day to make more of a week for them. A couple of other tile projects had been lingering on, including the half-bathroom off of the living room. That floor didn’t take long:

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This photo is before grouting the floor and baseboards. I’ll tile the pedestal and the counter top before I install the sink.

And lastly, the wall under the master bathroom sinks was still just stucco. Anibal and I tacked this project while Francisco finished grouting the carport floor:

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In the next photo, you can see that we didn’t tile around all the pipes. I’ll dress the area up with some aluminum covers. Stay tuned.

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The next day, Friday, while I still had the tile saw set up, I decided to install the tile baseboards in the living room, master bath, laundry, and the guest bedroom. I’ve always said that a room doesn’t look done until the baseboard is installed. It is still true. Here is a photo of a row of tiles that has been grouted but I still need to run a bead of caulk along the top of the tile and touch up the paint:

P1020833-001Here is a strip in the second bedroom that is all done:

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Bob watches the touch up paint dry.

One day, Anibal and Francisco were going great guns without me (no border tile to cut), so I decided to tackle a little unfinished project. I had never finished the top of the glass block window in the master bathroom, mainly because I didn’t know what to do with it. We did know, however, that we wanted some ventilation in the shower area next to the glass block window, and whatever I did had to keep rain out of the house. After some pondering, I figured it out.

I cut a line along the shipping container wall two-inches above the top of the glass blocks. Then I took a length of 2″x6″ steel cariola (a metal C chanel), welded ends on it, and placed it in the hole above the glass blocks. The 2″x6″ works well because it overhangs the glass blocks by about an inch on either side of the wall. I caulked it into place with urethane caulk.

The next day after the caulk had dried, I cut some window screening a foot wide and as long as the cariola. I rolled the screen into a tube and tucked it up into the space above the window. And viola! — the window now has an overhang that protects the opening from rain entering and also provides ventilation for the bathroom. The screening can be removed at any time for cleaning. I still need to prime and paint the new metal:

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Lastly for this week, I started building some picture frames. The long container wall in the living/dining room is desperately pleading for some art hanging on it.

Cynthia and I went through all the photos that we have taken on the property. We chose eight pictures of flowers and uploaded them to AllPosters.com. A couple weeks later (the shipping to Panama time), the enlargements arrived.

Yesterday I measured the prints and made most of the forms for some concrete picture frames. These will be thick and heavy, and I have in mind an idea for hanging them. Stay tuned. The next photo shows my progress on the concrete forms. What, you’ve never seen concrete picture frames? Neither have we. Should be fitting for our Natural-Industrial-Bling design style. Stay tuned:

P1020822-001That’s all for now. Thanks for stopping by.

10 thoughts on “Is It A Carport Or A Bohio?

  1. Well, all I can say is that I would not park MY car on that beautiful shiny, clean surface!!!! And as for concrete picture frames … look forward to seeing the finished product! Keep on having fun…cheers

    • Hi John,

      Good to hear from you. Thanks very much for your compliment and yes, the tile will be a bit slippery when wet. But it will make a great dance floor! We had originally planned to use the carport tile in the kitchen and had ordered it as such. But then when we changed our minds midstream and decided to use the brown, wood-grain tile in the kitchen, we had to use the extra somewhere, and the carport was it. The carport will remain dry most of the time unless we get a good blow of rain from the south-east. Thanks again John. Regards to you in the true deep south. Fred

  2. Nothing to do with construction, well, word construction maybe like the word carriola.

    RR is written in the loud sounds going between vowels.
    EXAMPLES: arroyo, arriba, carrera, parrilla or carriola.

    Now, back to my reading

    • Hi Alex,

      My favorite Spanish word is railroad — ferrocarril. It gets you coming and going! Actually, I am not 100% sure that there is a double r in the word carriola. It could be cariola; I’ll have to do some research. Online it translates to “stroller.” Good to hear from you Alex. Fred

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